Celebrating World Wine Day with our wine academics

Steve Goodman, Rebecca Dolan and Armando Corsi

Steve Goodman, Rebecca Dolan and Armando Corsi.

In celebration of World Wine Day on May 25, Dr’s Steve Goodman, Armando Corsi and Rebecca Dolan share with us their thoughts on one of the world’s most important commodities – WINE!

 

Dr Steve Goodman - Associate Professor of Marketing

  1. Where are your favourite wine regions and why?
    Anything South Australian from a parochial view – the joy of the Adelaide Hills and Clare in winter, to McLaren Vale and Barossa in Spring, Langhorne Creek for the ‘hidden gem’ feeling. Mornington to see what money and fashion can do for cellar door operations and Yarra Valley for the Chardonnay.
     
  2. What is your favourite type of wine and why?
    I like wines that are interesting – sometimes that doesn’t mean everyone likes them – I love it when a sommelier in a good restaurant asks if they can push you!  For white – Vermentino hits the spot, especially what Australian wineries are doing with it.  My favourite red is Dornfelder, inky and glass staining but surprisingly approachable – found it (thanks to a good sommelier) in Hobart in 2020 (early 2020!!)
     
  3. How did you get into teaching / researching in the wine business area?
    When I had a career change in 1999, the Head of School, where I did my honours, gave me a choice of ‘context’… the wine industry or Mitsubishi as a manufacturer. Looking at the wine industry, with 25-30% growth year on year and consumption increase of just 1-2%, I figured there’d be great opportunities. I can’t tell you how glad I am for that choice!
     
  4. What do you like the most about teaching wine business?
    The context, wine, is such a lively part of life for so many people – it employs theory but is so practical and driven.  When teaching and talking about it, it is so relatable rather than examples of widgets and so on.  It is so rewarding to see what people go on and achieve in their careers – I taught wine marketing at Waite in 2000/1, in the 20 years since, I see names pop up and bump into people working and thriving in an industry that is simply fantastic.
     
  5. What do you think will change in the wine industry in the next 10 years?
    Biggest change is one that I don’t see many in Australia acknowledging – the legalisation of medical and recreational cannabis. For years, various groups have gone on about the health implications of alcohol, and we see a move away from it amongst younger consumers – and then along comes cannabis, a herb that is prescribed by doctors for a range of conditions, and it is viewed as a healthy social option. It has implications for land use, labour for growing, picking and processing as well as competing for social use. Needs to be acknowledged more.

 

Dr Rebecca Dolan - Senior Lecturer

  1. Where are your favourite wine regions and why?
    It would be wrong of me to not say the Barossa, given this is where I grew up and initially learnt about the world of wine, but I’ve also visited some amazing regions close and far to home that have impressed me, including the Clare Valley, Tuscany, and Reims. I think all regions have something great to offer now; from wine, to food, and unique experiences, there is a lot to explore!
     
  2. What is your favourite type of wine and why?
    A Clare Valley Riesling in summer or a Barossa Shiraz in winter – but I’m open to trying new varieties and change my mind depending on the weather and food I’m eating! That being said, I would never turn down a Willows ‘The Doctor’ Sparkling Shiraz with bacon, eggs, and mushrooms!
     
  3. How did you get into teaching / researching in the wine business area?
    It was a bit of an accident to be honest, though I’m glad! I originally enrolled in a Bachelor of Viticulture/Oenology here at the University of Adelaide and at the same time began my first job working in Cellar Door Sales. About 1 semester in, I had realised that I much preferred talking about wine, rather than learning how to make it, so I switched to a Bachelor of Commerce majoring in Marketing, and never looked back! This lead to an honours year, a PhD, and eventually my current role.
     
  4. What do you like the most about teaching wine business?
    For me it’s the light bulb moments when I see students get really excited about something new they’ve learnt. Secondly, the way we are so closely integrated with industry means that our classes can be really practical, with guest speakers, industry panels, and different brands and companies as clients means that there is always something new to learn, for our teaching staff as well as our students.
     
  5. What do you think will change in the wine industry in the next 10 years?
    I’m personally really excited to see what happens in the space of zero and low alcohol wine alternatives. If consumption patterns, and production innovations continue to progress in the way they currently are, we should see some interesting changes in this category.

 
Dr Armando Corsi - Associate Professor of Wine Business

  1. Where are your favourite wine regions and why? 
    I have fond memories of many wine regions I visited. That’s the best part of it. Every region has something wonderful to offer.
     
  2. What is your favourite type of wine and why?
    Well, that all depends on how I feel, who I am with, what I am eating. There’s a perfect wine for every occasion.
     
  3. How did you get into teaching / researching in the wine business area? 
    My uncles are winemakers in Le Marche (Italy), and my father is an academic. Choosing to be an academic in-wine business was probably the best way to keep the whole family happy.
     
  4. What do you like the most about teaching wine business?
    Our students. I think those who decide to study wine business are first and foremost people who are passionate about wine. And this sense of cohort is reflected in the fact that, when our students graduate, the relationship with them (and amongst themselves) doesn’t end. And that means you’ll have someone to call in each city you can possibly travel to (that is, when we have the chance to travel again!)
     
  5. What do you think will change in the wine industry in the next 10 years? 
    I think we’ll see some significant transformations in the wines we’ll create, the way we’ll package them, and the way to reach out to customers. The overall goal we should pursue as a company (i.e. gaining more customers) won’t change, but we need to develop new strategies to reach this goal.
     
  6. Anything else to add?
    Always remember to enjoy wine, but do it so in moderation.

For more information and to study wine business with us visit our Wine Business website here.  

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